Health Benefits: The Fascinating History of Navel Oranges

Pictured: Oranges Preparing to Be Processed for Fresh Squeezed Florida Orange Juice

Pictured: Oranges Preparing to Be Processed for Fresh Squeezed Florida Orange Juice

Oranges are among the most popular fruits worldwide because of their unique, sweet and refreshing taste.  Also, because not only can they be found in great abundance and varieties, oranges have many important health benefits to the human body.  The navel orange, also known by its scientific term citrus sinensis, is one of the most popular of the orange tree varietals and also one of the most unique. 

Navel oranges are seedless, and once the peel is broken, the flesh inside is naturally very sweet and juicy.  From the outside, the blossom end of a navel orange looks like a human navel, which is how it acquired its name.  Inside, when a naval orange is broken or peeled, you can see a partially formed, undeveloped conjoined “twin” fruit on the blossom end. 

The antioxidant vitamin C is a main nutritional ingredient of navel oranges.  Millions of people drink orange juice from navel oranges daily as a source of vitamin C.  Vitamin C not only helps keep the human immune system strong, but it also helps the body absorb iron, works to heal wounds, and can even help prevent heart disease.  The human body does not naturally produce vitamin C on its own, so one of the best ways to get the right amount of this essential nutrient is to drink a fresh squeezed juice from a navel orange or to eat it right off the peel.

Other nutrients in navel oranges are also known to help to prevent cancer as well, such as stomach and esophagus cancer.  The high fiber content in navel oranges can help improve cholesterol ratios in the body, which is important in controlling diabetes. 

Beta-carotene is another antioxidant found in navel oranges which helps prevent cell damage.  Navel oranges also contain calcium, which promotes strong, healthy bones and vitamin B6 to boost production of hemoglobin in the bloodstream. The high potassium content in navel oranges helps maintain the balance of electrolytes in cells, and its magnesium helps keep blood pressure at an acceptable level.

But one of the most unique things about the naval orange is its history.  To this day, all navel oranges are clones which still originate from a tree in Brazil from almost 200 years ago.  This single tree propagated spontaneous clones and led to being grown in other regions. 

These mutations can only be cultivated through tree cuttings and being grafted onto other trees.  Producing navel oranges is considered a very big industry in the United States and economically important to California, Florida and Arizona where they are primarily grown.

  • Winsor Pilates

Comments

5 Responses to “Health Benefits: The Fascinating History of Navel Oranges”
  1. PAUL J. HINTERSTEINER says:

    I am request permission to use some of your articles in my book the history of food to help this and the next generation to live healthier lives.

  2. Sandy Sachs, Senior Editor says:

    This would be allowed as long as credit to our blog is given. A link to our blog should be posted online and standard reference guidelines when published in print. Thanks for your request.

  3. PAUL J. HINTERSTEINER says:

    Dear Editor, Author, or persons authorized to give copyright permission.

    I am writing to you to get the permission to use your articles in my book The Foodpedia Fresh Fruits and Vegetables books series and other books will follow, on the history of other items in the food world. That will help the people of the world to eat and stay Healthier.

    I care and I hope you care about passing on to the new generation to stay Healthier.

    (REMEMBER SHARING IS CARING !)

    I am writing these books to “give back” my knowledge to the next generation of people, all over this world. I am writing these books to educate the people about the advantages of eating “Fresh Fruits” and “Fresh Vegetables” and how they can help themselves to have a healthier body, and the foods that are not good for a healthy body.

    I got your name from the website. On the Fruit you wrote about. I have your name on the information that I used, so that you will get all the credit on it. I do not want the credit for your works. You’re the one that did all the research on the food items. I have to rely on you for all this knowledge and your researchers.

    I praise you for this, that is why I want you to get all the credit you put in to these articles.
    I have to rely on your help to teach and training our next generation to live healthier. Then living on all this junk food and all the chemical’s they put into the foods we eat today.
    That is why we are the product of this generation of obesity etc. We have to help our new generation to eat and stay healthier so they can have a better life, then being sick and overweight all the time.
    The world is changing and we have to change with it NOW for our kid’s sake.

    This is the 21st Century NOW, and we have to do something about it NOW!
    I am on a movement (mission) of caring and share to help, not to make the same mistake this generation and our pass generations has made, to help them live healthier lives better then we did.

    But I need your help to get this mission (movement) going. I need your permission to let this happen, to use your research in food, to train and educate the people of the world to eat healthier.

    Remember the people will go to your website for more updates. Because you are always updating it, that I cannot do.
    Can you please e-mail the permission letter to authorize me to use your articles in my books (The History of Fresh Fruits. { Foodpedia The History of Fresh Fruit }) I have about 130 chapters of some of the fresh fruit used around the world, with over 5,000 color pictures, and about 5,000 pages).
    Can you please email {foodpedia8@gmail.com } with your permission to use your articles so we can help the this and the next generation to live and be healthier.

    Thank You Chef Paul J. Hintersteiner

    Enclosed is the website of the articles I need permission on

    1.http://www.citrus.com/health-benefits-the-fascinating-history-of-navel-oranges/

  4. PAUL J. HINTERSTEINER says:

    This is the second time I am asking permission to use your one article in my book I sent a requesting permission on 2/4/15 and Have heard from you and join me the quest to give back and help our next generation to eat healthier.
    This just one article that can help. So join me in the quest to care. Thank You Paul J. Hintersteiner

  5. Sandy Sachs, Senior Editor says:

    We sent a message to your email address at the time of your first request. Permission is granted as long as credit is given and a link posted online. Standard reference guidelines apply when published in print. Hope this helps and thank you for contacting us for permission!

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