Bearss Lemon Tree

Growing Zones in Ground: 8 - 11 / in Pots: 4 - 11

$52.95

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Size Age Price Est. Arrival
1 Gallon 1 Year $52.95 Monday, September 2nd

Ships on Monday, September 2nd

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Description

Bearss Lemon trees are fast growing, and produce very few thorns compared to other lemons. The fruit is juicy with a sharp tartness valued for use in beverages, lemon desserts, and other dishes

The Bearss Lemon tree variety originated as a seedling discovered in the Bearss citrus grove near Lutz, Florida in 1952. Bearss Lemon trees are fast growing, and produce very few thorns compared to other lemons. The fruit is juicy with a sharp tartness valued for use in beverages, lemon desserts, and other dishes. Bearss Lemons are also known to have fewer seeds and more juice than other lemons of the same size.

Bearss Lemon trees are hardy in USDA zones 9 to 11, and can be grown in a container and moved indoors for winter in colder climates.

Citrus Tree Care

The Bearss Lemon tree reaches a size of between 12 and 18 feet tall and 16 feet wide. Be sure to leave enough room on all sides of the tree when planting. Plant in sandy well-drained soil that contains plenty of organic matter. Prune away any dead or dying branches and cut off any sucker branches that appear at the tree base.

If growing in a container, place in a sunny window or on a sunny patio in spring and summer. Move your Bearss Lemon tree indoors in winter to avoid freezing conditions. Remember that when you relocate a citrus tree from outdoors to in, and back, it is normal for the tree to shed leaves. Fallen leaves will grow back and this process is natural and will not harm the tree.

Fruit & Harvesting

Bearss Lemon trees bloom fragrant white blooms in late spring and early summer, and produce mature fruit from August to December. Fruit can be picked when light yellow-green to bright yellow. Harvested Bearss Lemons will last for up to one week if stored in a cool place, or longer if refrigerated. While the Bearss Lemon tree is mostly thornless, some thorns may persist, so use caution when picking.

Growing Zones

Advice

Feeding a Bearss Lemon tree is an important part of growing a solid crop of lemons. Composted grass clippings, leaves, and organic material can be spread under the tree to provide slow release feeding. You can also fertilize with citrus fertilizer once every three months. Follow the fertilizer directions for dosages according to tree size and age. Always water fertilizer in thoroughly and never allow compost or thick mulch to rest against the tree base.

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