Dwarf Brown Select Satsuma Tree

Growing Zones in Ground: 8 - 11 / in Pots: 4 - 11

$52.95$74.95

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Description

The Dwarf Brown Select Satsuma Tree is an evergreen citrus tree that is cold tolerant. It has open-spread branching, bears fragrant white flowers, and fruit concentrated in clusters along the branches. The Brown Select Satsuma Tree fruit is tasty, juicy, sugary sweet, and typically seedless.

The Satsuma mandarin tree originated in China and has been grown for more than 2000 years. This tangerine tree was taken to Japan by monks who developed it further. It reached the United Sates in the 1870s with the help of the wife of a United States minister to Japan who sent the seeds back home.

The Brown Select Satsuma dwarf citrus tree was created in order to fill the market gap between the harvests of other Satsuma varieties. It originated from open-pollinated ‘Kimbrough’ seedlings collected at CRS or Citrus Research Station in Louisiana in the late 1960s and selected in the middle of post-freeze assessment after 1983. It was field-tested at the CRS as LA 4-40 and was later named Brown Select, in honor of the CRS’ former citrus researcher and superintendent, Ralph Brown.

The Dwarf Brown Select Satsuma Tree (Citrus unshiu Brown Select) is an evergreen citrus tree of the family Rutaceae that is cold tolerant and can be grown outdoors in USDA growing zones 8-11. It is also suitable planted in a pot in colder areas with severe weather conditions. The Satsuma dwarf tangerine tree grows up to 8 ft in height but can be maintained at 6 feet with regular pruning. It has open-spread branching, bears fragrant white flowers,and fruit concentrated in clusters along the branches. The fruit this dwarf citrus tree produces is tasty, juicy, sugary sweet, and typically seedless.

Citrus Tree Care

Dwarf Brown Select Satsuma mandarin trees are just like other citrus trees in that they do not need a lot of hands on care. Just give them lots of sunshine, water and feed them, and they will give you an abundant harvest.

  • Before buying a dwarf citrus tree make sure that you have selected a good location for it. If planted in the ground choose an area where it can bathe in full sunlight for 6-8 hours a day with high humidity. If planted in a pot make space for it in front of a sunny window.
  • Keep in mind that when buying a mandarin tree you will get a young tree with a root system that is not yet established. When planting outdoors it is advisable to plant the Dwarf Brown Select Satsuma tree and other dwarf mandarin trees after spring through fall to avoid frost damage.
  • Like all growing citrus trees, Satsuma trees do not like wet feet so they should be planted in a well-draining soil. They also have to be deeply watered regularly. However, make sure that watering is properly spaced and that the 2-3 inches of topsoil has dried out before watering again. Yellowing and droopy leaves are a sure sign of overwatering. If you notice brown and dry leaves then you may be under watering your tree.
  • Growing citrus trees should be fed citrus fertilizer to help them grow well and bear fruit. Tangerine trees like the Brown Select Satsuma Tree should be given fertilizer for citrus trees during spring and summer season once every six weeks to ensure a healthy growth cycle and at the same time rehabilitate the soil and replenish the nutrients.
  • When you buy mandarin trees they usually arrive in a 3 gallon container. It is highly advised that you repot citrus trees in a container that is one to two pot sizes bigger to ensure they have enough space to grow. The pots should have plenty of holes in the bottom to allow for proper water drainage.

Planting Instructions for Potted citrus trees (applicable if winter season temperature is constantly below 40º F).

  1. Fill your repotting containers halfway with potting soil and gently place your newly delivered citrus trees in them.
  2. Fill in space around the trees with potting soil without covering the grafted section of the trees. Ensure to leave an inch from top of the soil to the rim of the containers for easy watering.
  3. Pat-down the soil to fill in any gaps and air holes. Right after planting deeply water the trees until water flows out of the holes at the bottom of the container.
  4. Place the citrus trees in front of a south-facing window to have enough sunlight during daytime. Humidity may be needed and you may have to create it by placing a tray with pebbles and water underneath the canopy or by misting the foliage daily.

Fruit & Harvesting

Fruit

Brown Select Satsumas are oblate, medium to large mandarin-type fruits measuring 6 to 10 cm wide and 2 to 3 cm tall. The peel is smooth and somewhat leathery with noticeable oil glands. These mandarins have yellow to yellow-orange color and the rind easily separates from the flesh

The firm flesh of Brown Select Satsumas is dark orange, supremely succulent with excellent sweet flavor, and is typically seedless although some fruit may have a few seeds.

These sweet and somewhat tangy Brown Select Satsumas are generally eaten out of hand, but can also be added to salads, desserts, and some main dishes.

The peel of Brown Select can be zested or dried, and can be used as a spice for cooking, baking, cocktails, drinks, and even candy.

Harvesting

Brown Select fruit usually ripen at a specific time of the year but may vary for several weeks. Fruit may be harvested in mid October until January. The difference in ripening time is caused by the condition of the tree, weather condition and temperature variances.

Generally, the Satsumas rind color is partially orange when ripe. However, there are instances when the rind of mature fruits are green. The best way to determine if Satsumas are ready for harvest is by tasting the fruit. If the fruit is still sour do not harvest the other fruit, rather leave them on the tree for a few more weeks. After a few weeks do another test taste and if the level of sweetness is acceptable you can go ahead and harvest the rest of the fruit.

Satsumas easily bruise so make sure to use clippers when harvesting the fruit and handle them with care.

Growing Zones

Advice

Brown Select Satsuma tangerine trees are cold and drought tolerant trees that are best planted in the ground in USDA growing zones 8-11 and planted in a pot in colder areas. They usually grow up to 8 ft when planted in the ground and 6 ft when planted in a pot. Brown Select Satsumas’ usual bloom season is in Spring and fruit harvesting season is October to January. The fruit needs heat to sweeten and should be planted in an area where it can enjoy full sunlight for 6 to 8 hours a day. During winter Brown Select Satsuma trees should be protected especially when the temperature dips below 28º F.

Pest and Diseases

Satsumas diseases caused by fungi or bacteria are mostly caused by incessant fog or rain. Common diseases that strike Satsumas are:

  • Bacterial Blast (Pseudomonas syringae) – Attacks trees that are planted in cool, wet and windy areas during Spring and Winter. Signs of infection are black spots on the leaf stem and curling leaves that eventually wither and drop.

Recommended treatment for Bacterial blast is copper fungicide that should be sprayed on the citrus tree before the wet and cool season begins.

  • Mandarin Rind Disorder afflictsmandarin trees, particularly the Satsumas, in Autumn during heavy rainfall. Symptoms of this disorder include sunken areas and water-soaked, brown blotches on the rind.

Horticulturists recommend horticultural oil to ward off water when heavy rain in Autumn is forecasted.

Pests

  • Aphids – Causes curled and gnarled leaves. They also produce a sticky substance that promotes development of sooty molds.

You can manage aphid growth by using biological controls, insecticidal soap or horticultural sprays. For minor infestations you can spray the infected leaves with water mixed with mild dishwashing solution.

  • Soft Scales – Similar to aphids, scales produce a sweet, sticky substance that promotes growth of black sooty molds. It also reduces trees’ vigor and causes die back.

Management includes application of horticultural oils and beneficial bugs that are natural predators to scales.

FAQs

The leaves on my tree are falling off. Why?

Many circumstances can cause falling leaves on a citrus tree. One is overwatering. A second is adequate watering, but poorly drained, or saturated soil. Also, some pests or diseases may cause yellowing leaves that fall away, such as aphids, canker, or some fungi. Finally, it is possible that a lack of nutrients is causing the falling leaves.

Can a Satsuma Brown Select Tree be grown in a pot inside?

Yes. A potted citrus tree can grow indoors if it is placed in a location that gets plenty of sunlight, or is supplemented with growing lights. One option is to move the container grown tree outside in warmer months, and overwinter it indoors. If the tree must remain inside, place it in a bright window, and turn the container monthly. The best citrus to grow indoors are the smaller or dwarf varieties.

The leaves on my tree are turning yellow. Why?

A few things may cause yellowing leaves on a citrus tree. One is overwatering. A second is adequate watering but poorly drained, or saturated soil. Also, some pests or diseases may cause yellowing leaves, such as aphids, canker, or some fungi. Finally, it is possible that a lack of nutrients is causing the yellow leaves. However, too much nitrogen can also cause this condition.

Can a Dwarf Satsuma Brown Select Tree be grown in a pot inside?

Yes. A potted citrus tree can grow indoors if it is placed in a location that gets plenty of sunlight, or is supplemented with growing lights. One option is to move the container grown tree outside in warmer months, and overwinter it indoors. If the tree must remain inside, place it in a bright window, and turn the container monthly. The best citrus to grow indoors are smaller or dwarf varieties.

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