Lila Avocado Tree

Growing Zones in Ground: 8 - 11 / in Pots: 4 - 11

(1 customer review)

$95.95$105.95

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Size Height Price Est. Arrival
3 Gallon 3 - 4 FT $95.95 Tuesday, November 3rd
AccessoriesEssential add-ons to ensure the health and growth of your trees. Accessories ship separately but at the same time as your tree.

Ships on Tuesday, November 3rd

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Description

The remarkable Lila Avocado tree is unique because the tree is a semi dwarf variety that produces excellent fruit. The Lila Avocado Tree will reach a mature size of about ten feet tall, and can be kept even smaller by pruning. Some older trees can reach larger sizes, but the Lila Avocado is quite small for an avocado tree. This makes it a good choice for anyone living in colder areas who want a container-grown avocado.

Mature Lila Avocado Trees can be cold hardy down to 15 degrees F. As such, Lila Avocados can be grown in the ground in USDA Zones 8 to 11. Fruit of the Lila Avocados is green, shiny, and has a rich, nutty flavor that is considered of high quality.

Avocado Tree Care

Since Lila Avocado Trees remain at a smaller size than traditional avocado varieties, they can be planted in smaller gardens or places with limited space for larger trees. The Lila Avocado tree still does best in full sun and well-drained soil. They also prefer a spot that has good air-flow.=

Lila Avocado Trees can be grown in a container on a patio or porch that receives full sun for at least 6 ours per day. You can also grow a potted Lila Avocado Tree inside over the coldest winter months. Place the tree in a south-facing window and supplement with grow lights if needed. Use a potting saucer to catch water so you can thoroughly water the tree while indoors. When spring arrives, move your potted avocado tree outdoors for the warmer time of year.

Fruit & Harvesting

Lila Avocado Trees grow medium-sized fruit that are from 6 to 12 ounces each when mature. The fruit is dark green with a yellow-green flesh that is smooth and has a good flavor. Lila Avocados will have fruit from August to October, with some individual trees setting fruit a month earlier or later than others.

In areas with many avocado trees, a Lila Avocado grown alone can produce fruit. The more avocado trees you have, the higher the yield you can expect from each. Harvest the fruit when it reaches full size (6 to 10 ounces) and ripens once picked. The fruit can be picked by hand from the ground, or reached with a picking pole and basket tool.

Growing Zones

Plant Growing Zones

Advice

Lila Avocado Trees are a considered a dwarf or semi-dwarf variety. Since they can remain smaller when mature (up to 10 feet tall) which makes these avocado trees great for smaller areas. However, this tree should still be given its own space. Space the new tree at least twelve feet from other trees, walls, or buildings. A sunny location with well-drained, higher ground is preferable to any spot that is prone to standing water.

 

FAQs

Can I grow a Lila Avocado Tree in a place that freezes in winter?

The Lila Avocado is considered to be a cold hardy avocado. Mature trees can withstand temperatures as low as 15 degrees. However, prolonged freezing can affect tree health. If you are outside of USDA Zones 8-11, plant your Lila Avocado tree in a suitable container, and over-winter it indoors.

What is the fruit of a Lila Avocado Tree like?

Lila Avocados are small to medium sized fruits that are shiny, dark green, and a rounded oval shape. The flesh is yellow-green, smooth, and has a pleasing, nutty flavor. They are considered a high quality avocado.

Is the Lila Avocado Tree the same as the Lula Avocado Tree?

While the names are similar, the Lila Avocado Tree is not the same as the Lula Avocado Tree. The Lula Avocado is a larger tree that is less cold-hardy than the smaller, semi-dwarf Lila Avocado Tree.

Where is the Lila Avocado Tree from?

Like the Joey Avocado Tree, the Lila Avocado Tree was first discovered in Uvalde, Texas. Both are cold-hardy varieties that can be grown in USDA Zones 8-11.

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